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Art Nouveau Style Architecture

The Origins of Architectural Designs

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Architecture has always been the designing of structures dominated by their time in history.  Whether in present times or 2,000 years ago, architects defined their creativity in ways that would be appealing to the populace, religious influences, and cultures.  Architecture influences future designs that will incorporate portions from past designs while forming structures that are unique.

 

Adirondack Architecture

Adirondack Architecture

This style of architecture harmonizes with the outdoors, creating designs that compliment surrounding nature.  It’s rugged design used natural building materials that are found in the Adirondack Mountains.  Natural materials such as roots, bark, granite and logs, to name a few, allowing architects to create structures that blended in with the landscape.  Massive fireplaces and chimneys were cut from stone and were extremely popular with the great campsites constructed for wealthy families like the Vanderbilts.  The Adirondack Mountains are located in upstate New York and was a popular retreat for the wealthy barons of the Victorian era through the 1940s.

As mentioned earlier, many architectural designs borrowed from other forms.  Adirondack Architecture developed their design based on Swiss chalets which were first introduced to America by architect Andrew Jackson Downing around 1850.  William West Durant (1850-1934) designed camps in the Adirondack Great Camp style in areas that are now National Historic Landmarks.

Some Examples Of This Architecture: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adirondack_Architecture

 

Adamesque

Adam Style Architecture (Adamesque)

This design came from pieces of Neoclassical designs in the 18th century which revolutionized the industry with a graceful, fresh look.  Also called Adamesque or Style of the Brothers Adam.  Three Scottish brothers designed interiors and architecture, most commonly known were Robert Adams (1728-1792) and James Adams (1732-1994).

Their architecture was very popular with the middle-class and upper-class homes in the 1760s.  Their distinctive designs are prominent in walls, fireplaces, fixtures, fittings, carpet and ceilings.  Most commonly constructed in Britain and Russian and post-Revolutionary War United States.  In the United States, this design took on the name of Federal design which lasted until 1795.  In 1795 this style was replaced by the Regency and French Empire styles.

Read More & See Examples of this Style: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_style

 

Art Nouveau Style Architecture

Art Nouveau Style Architecture

In French Art Nouveau translates to “New Art” and was extremely popular in the late 19th and 20th centuries.  This style brought about very multi-colorful buildings, especially throughout Europe.  This style influenced everything from textiles, furniture, jewelry, lighting, and even fine art.

Buildings were asymmetrical shapes, stained glass, mosaics, arches and surfaces adorned floral motifs and plant image decorations.  Many associate this style with the 1920s and early 30s in the U.S.

Examples Of Art Nouveau Architecture: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Nouveau

 

Indian Architecture

Indian Architecture

Indian architecture is deeply rooted in their history, religion, and culture.  The design developed from various influences that were the result of India’s global discourse in other regions throughout its past.  Its design, structure and decorative surfaces are distinctive to the region that was influenced by western design in ancient India.  It was especially influenced from the Buddhist Stupa of the Colonial Era.  Due to economic reforms in 1991, urban architecture of India became more integrated with the world economy.

You can read more about this wonderful form of architecture and see its many styles here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architecture_of_India

 

Islamic Architecture

Islamic Architecture

The most common designs include domes, towers, Islamic calligraphy and used widely for tombs, mosques, and forts.  Probably the most notable examples of this architectural design is the Alhambra. The very specific and recognizable architectural style came after Muhammad’s time and was inspired by previous Sassanid & Byzantine styles.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islamic_architecture

 

Ottonian Architecture

Ottonian Architecture

This architecture evolved during the reign of Emperor Otto The Great in Germany.  It was predominant from the middle 10th century until the middle 11th century.  Ottonian was strongly influenced by Byzantine and Carolingian architecture.

An example of this design can be seen in the apse of the Abbey of the Holy Trinity in Essen and has kept the Carolingian double-ended features of apses at either end of the church.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottonian_architecture

 

Victorian Architecture

Victorian Architecture

Probably one of the most recognized form of architecture, this style was at its peek during the reign of Queen Victoria from 1837 to 1901.  Structures in this design are massive, extremely decorative and in many cases quite colorful.  If walking through an authentic Victorian home, you will notice timber-framed box forms, overhangs, irregular floor plans, extravagant or simplistic in nature.

This form of architecture was strongly influenced by the Middle East and Asian designs.  Victorian came after Georgian and Regency designs and was later replaced by the Edwardian style of architecture.

In the United States, an authentic Victorian home was not designed with closets.  Instead homeowners used armoires.  This is because back in Victorian times, homes were taxed by the number of rooms within the home and closets were considered rooms!  Rooms were generally larger to compensate for the number of rooms in the upper-class homes.  Read more about Victorian Architecture & Beautiful Designs:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victorian_architecture


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